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Tuesday, 07 May 2024 13:59

E-commerce giant Amazon launches operations in South Africa.

By Lehlohonolo Lehana.

Tech giant Amazon has launched its South African market overnight, officially beginning operations in its first African country. 

Amazon will be available on its website or the Amazon Shopping App, which will offer customers a selection of 'local and international brands across 20 different product categories'.

It is expected to shake-up South Africa's e-commerce space and take on established local players such as Naspers-owned Takealot, which comprises Takealot.com, Mr D Food and Superbalist.

It is also expected to rival online marketplaces Bob Shop, Massmart-owned Makro Marketplace, Zando and Bidorbuy, among others.

Amazon first announced plans to launch its platform in South Africa in October last year.

Customers can enjoy free delivery on their first order, followed by free delivery for subsequent orders above R500 for products fulfilled by Amazon. With each order, customers will receive status updates via WhatsApp, so they will be able to track their parcel every step of the way.

Amazon is also offering 30-day returns via home pickup and self-drop.

"We are excited to launch Amazon.co.za, along with thousands of independent sellers in South Africa. We provide customers with great value, broad selection—including international and local products—and a convenient delivery experience, "said Robert Koen, managing director of Amazon in Sub-Saharan Africa.

"From today, customers can count on Amazon.co.za for a stress-free shopping experience, fast and reliable delivery, access to 3 000 pickup points, 24/7 customer support, and easy returns, "Koen added.

Amazon has also partnered with goGOGOgo, a South African non-profit organisation, offering customers the opportunity to package eligible products in handmade gift bags.

Based in Johannesburg with projects across South Africa, goGOGOgo is dedicated to building the capacity, skills and knowledge of grandmothers, locally known as GOGOs.